Google AdWords #1 Killer Hacks

Mastering Quality Score with the “One Per” Rule

Google AdWords #1 Killer Hacks: Mastering Quality Score with the “One Per” Rule

 

 

Just uttering the phrase “Quality Score” can strike fear in the hearts of Google AdWords advertisers.

What is it?
How does it work?
What can I do to make it better?

I get these questions all the time, and my response to them is always, “Follow the ‘One Per’ Rule.”

As the name suggests, the One Per Rule requires you to limit the number of keywords per Ad Group to 1. It may sound a little crazy and counter-intuitive, but there is a method behind the madness.

 

Limiting yourself to one keyword per ad group ensures that your keyword is tied closely to your ad text and the text on your landing page.

This tells Google that your relevancy is through the roof, therefore awarding you a high Quality Score. It’s easily my favorite Google AdWords hack.

This isn’t a technique to use with every keyword, however. Only employ the “One Per” Rule on your top-performing keywords. Here’s how to get it going:

 

Step 1 — Research. Select the Campaign you want to optimise and locate your five to 10 top-performing keywords across Ad Groups. If you’re looking to optimise conversions, choose the keywords that are most successful in generating that result. Or, if you want to optimise cost per conversion or cost per click, choose those top keywords. Every keyword you choose should be competitive when it comes to click-through rate (one percent and above).

 

Step 2 — Create one AdGroup per keyword. Create an Ad Group for each of your top-performing keywords. If you have five top keywords, you should also have five Ad Groups. Keep things organised by using each individual keyword as the name of the Ad Group.

 

Step 3 — Ensure your ad text is relevant. One of the keys to ensuring the “One Per” Rule is effective is sprinkling the keyword throughout the ad text. The keyword in your Ad Group will appear multiple times in your ad text and again on your landing page. Quality Scores tend to be higher when the keyword appears in the ad headline, description and display URL. If one of my top-performing keywords is “women’s hats,” the structure of my ad should be similar to the one shown below:

 

Step 4 — Optimise your landing page. The final step in the “One Per” Rule is simple: Ensure the keyword appears somewhere on your landing page.
Thinking about Quality Score as numbers between one and 10 makes it easy to forget why it’s really important — it’s Google’s way to determine how you as an advertiser create a good user experience by matching your ad to its message, its destination and what you are offering the consumer. Following the “One Per” Rule puts you in a position to check each one of those boxes and makes your life a little easier along the way.

 

Not sure how to set up your own winning Landing Page? Still not sure about “Quality Score?”

Further Reading:

 

I really hope this helped. Hey, have I missed anything here? Drop me a note in the comments section below and let me know your thoughts. Please take your time to grasp this concept properly. Believe me, it works!

 

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Phil Adair

Hot Clicks Pay-Per-Click Online Marketing

Suite 12, 5th Floor, Dymocks Building

428 George Street, Sydney 2000, NSW, Australia  

W: hotclicks.com.au

I’m a huge fan of connecting on social media. If you’re on these social networks, then let’s follow each other: 

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Phil Adair is the host of one of the most downloaded online marketing podcasts on the internet (Go here to subscribe and listen to The Online Marketing Strategies Show.)

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4 Key Reasons Local Businesses Fail When Using Google AdWords

4 Key Reasons Local Businesses Fail When Using Google AdWords

You’ve likely heard other business owners trashing Google AdWords as expensive, complicated, and ineffective. Good, let them! That just means there’ll be less competition for you.

AdWords does get a bad rap in many circles, and while clicks are expensive for most people and the interface complex, most of the time when advertisers get bad results, they only have themselves (or those they hire to manage their campaigns) to blame.

There are four main reasons local businesses fail with Google AdWords. Let’s cover them here so you know exactly what you’re in for.

 

1. Landing page or an awful landing page

The first page a visitor to your site lands on after clicking on your Google ad is called the landing page. A landing page is an essential part of your AdWords campaign, and a good one can instantly double your leads from AdWords (without spending a cent more on clicks.)

Not having a dedicated, high-converting landing page is a huge mistake. Based on experience, we estimate the typical local business website converts somewhere around 5 percent. On the other hand, a better-designed landing page can easily convert at 10 percent to 20 percent.

Even if we assume it just converts on the low end – around 10 percent – versus the 5 percent for the typical website, you’d double the amount of leads you get for the same money spent.

That means for every $1,000 you spend, instead of getting 10 leads, you’re now getting 20. That difference could literally make or break your month or year.

Further reading: The Ultimate Beginners Guide To Landing Pages 

 

bad

2. Horrible ads with low clickthrough rates

Most Google ads say basically the same thing. (And, quite frankly, they’re not all that compelling in the way they say it.)

As with landing pages, a high-converting Google ad with a high clickthrough rate (CTR) can also instantly double your leads. And the best part is that Google rewards you for having high-converting ads. So not only will doubling your CTR get you twice as many potential leads, but you can also end up paying a lot less per click.

That’s because Google has an algorithm known as Quality Score that determines how much you pay for clicks. In AdWords, just because you bid the most for a keyword doesn’t guarantee your ad will show up in the top position. Google rewards relevancy. And if you can show Google your ad is more relevant than your competitors (and CTR is the number-one factor used to determine relevancy), you can end up ranking higher than your competitors, yet pay less per click than they do.

 

3. No conversion or call tracking

We’ve seen that 60 percent to 70 percent of the leads for local businesses come in the form of a phone call. Furthermore, phone call leads tend to be higher-quality leads because someone who’s really a hot lead is most likely going to pick up the phone and call rather than just submit the information through a form on your website.

If you’re not tracking call conversion, then you’re missing out on not only 60 percent to 70 percent of your leads, but also your hottest leads. Not tracking call conversions also means you’re not going to be able to optimize your AdWords campaign well. You can throw a ton of money away on bad clicks if you’re not tracking calls and have the data that shows you which keywords and ads are making the phone ring and which ones are not.

Campaign-Structure_large

4. Poor campaign structure

With all the AdWords books, articles, and training courses available, it’s somewhat surprising we even have to mention this. However, we still see AdWords campaigns every week that are set up poorly (many times by agencies that should know better) and don’t even adhere to basic best practices.

One example of poor campaign structure is a single campaign that runs on both Search and Display Networks. Search and Display are two utterly different beasts, and they should never be lumped together in a single campaign (in fact, I urge you to avoid using the Display Network to advertise your local business, until you develop strong AdWords skills and seek additional training.)

Other examples include only having one ad group, having too many keywords, and going too broad with the keywords in your campaign.

AdWords may not work all the time for every local business – there are some situations where due to high click costs, budgets, internal sales problems, or other issues that even a well-structured AdWords campaign won’t generate a high enough ROI.

However, in my experience, that’s the exception much more often than the rule.

 

I really hope this helped. Hey, have I missed anything here though? Have you had any “disastrous fails” that you’re willing to share? Drop me a note in the comments section below and let me know your thoughts. 

 

Like this post at all? Why not Pin it!

 

Remember to subscribe to my podcast 

 

Check out my [FREE] AdWords Video Training Series.

Get Instant Access Here >>

7 Absolutely Killer Tips For Google AdWords & Why They Crush The Competition

 

 

How to Build an Email List FAST – 7 Simple Methods You Can Use for FREE

Download The eBook Now:

 

Download here >>

 

 

Phil Adair

Hot Clicks Pay-Per-Click Online Marketing

Suite 12, 5th Floor, Dymocks Building

428 George Street, Sydney 2000, NSW, Australia  

W: hotclicks.com.au

I’m a huge fan of connecting on social media. If you’re on these social networks, then let’s follow each other: 

Twitter 

Google  

Facebook

YouTube

Pinterest

Instagram

 

About Phil Adair

Phil Adair is the host of one of the most downloaded online marketing podcasts on the internet (Go here to subscribe and listen to The Online Marketing Strategies Show.)

Read his inspiring bio now.

Feel free to send Phil a message here >>